.

.

.
.
Bloat
(Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus)
What is bloat?

Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is also known as "bloat," "stomach torsion," or "twisted stomach. GDV is an extremely serious condition, and should be considered a life-threatening emergency when it occurs. Dogs can die of bloat within several hours. Even with treatment, as many as 25-33% of dogs with GDV die.
The gastric dilatation is one part of the condition and the volvulus or torsion is the second part. In bloat, due to a number of different and sometimes unknown reasons, the stomach fills up with air and puts pressure on the other organs and diaphragm. This makes it difficult for the dog to breathe, and compresses large veins in the abdomen, thus preventing blood from returning to the heart. Filled with air, the stomach can easily rotate on itself, thus pinching off the blood supply. Once this rotation (volvulus) occurs and the blood supply is cut off, the stomach begins to die and the entire blood supply is disrupted and the animal's condition begins to deteriorate very rapidly. Not all dogs that have a gas buildup and resultant dilatation develop the more serious and life threatening volvulus. However, almost all dogs that have a volvulus develop it as a result of a dilatation. GDV is a very serious and life threatening condition. Understanding the signs, prevention, and need for prompt treatment will help reduce the risk of mortality if your dog develops this problem.

Everyday care of the bulldog
Bulldog Eye Care
Bulldog Health Information
General Health Problems
Hereditary Diseases
Transferable Diseases
Heat stroke in Bulldogs
Swimming Puppy Syndrome
Related Pages
The Bulldog Information Library 2003-2011 © All rights reserved.
Original idea, design and development by Catherine Marien-de Luca. No part of bulldoginformation.com may be copied, distributed, printed or reproduced on another website without the owner's written permission. Please feel free to link from your site to any of the pages on this website in a non-frame presentation only.
The Veterinarian'sz Guide to Your Dog's Symptoms
Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook
(Hardcover)
by Debra M., DVM Eldredge (Author), Liisa D., DVM Carlson (Author), Delbert G., DVM Carlson (Author), James M., MD Giffin (Author), Beth Adelman Editor)
More information:
UC Davis Book of Dogs :
The Complete Medical Reference Guide for Dogs and Puppies
by Mordecai Siegal
More information:

The Veterinarian's Guide to Your Dog's Symptoms
by Michael S. DVM Garvey
More information:
Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook
Merck/Merial Manual for Pet Health
The Merck/Merial Manual for Pet Health:
The complete pet health resource for your dog, cat, horse or other pets - in everyday language. (Paperback)
by Merck Publishing and Merial (Author), Cynthia M Kahn (Editor), Scott Line (Editor)
More information:

Disclaimer:
The information contained in this article expresses the opinions and views of the owner of Bulldoginformation.com or the original author of the article. It is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional veterinary advice.
No responsibility or liability can be accepted for any loss or damage which results from using or misinterpreting any opinions uttered, products suggested or information mentionned in this web site, whether this information or advice stems from the owner of the site or from a third party.
Recommended Books
About Bulldoginformation.com: Sitemap | About us | Privacy | Copyright | Contact
Dog Care Questions > Bloat in Dogs
The Canine Information Library
Dog Care Questions
| Dog Care | Dog Breeds A to Z | Dog Breed Finder | Dog Breeds of the World | Most Popular Dog BreedsDog Books |
Custom Search
Holly Nash, DVM, MS
Veterinary Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.
What dogs are more susceptible?

Breed

There is a definite link between the likelihood of occurrence of GDV and the breed and build of the dog. GDV is much more likely to occur in large breeds with deep, narrow chests. The problem can occur in small dogs, but only rarely. The University of Purdue recently conducted a study of hundreds of dogs that had developed GDV, and they calculated a ratio of likelihood of a particular breed developing the problem as compared to a mixed breed dog. For example, using the GDV risk ratio, a Great Dane is 41.4 times more likely to develop GDV than a mixed breed dog.

Photo © Tyler Olson - Fotolia.com
Breed
GDV Risk Ratio
Risk Rank
Great Dane
Saint Bernard
Weimaraner
Irish Setter
Gordon Setter
Standard Poodle
Basset Hound
Doberman Pinscher
Old English Sheepdog
German Shorthaired Pointer
Newfoundland
German Shepherd
Airedale Terrier
Alaskan Malamute
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Boxer
Collie
Labrador Retriever
English Springer Spaniel
Samoyed
Dachshund
Golden Retriever
Rottweiler
Mixed
Miniature Poodle
41.4
21.8
19.3
14.2
12.3
8.8
4.8
4.6
4.4
4.2
4.1
4.1
5.9
5.5
3.7
3.7
2
2
1.6
1.6
1.2
1.1
1.0
2.8
0.3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Genetics

In addition to breed predilection, there appears to be a genetic link to this disease. The incidence is closely correlated to the depth and width of the dog's chest. Several different genes from the parents determine these traits. If both parents have particularly deep and narrow chests, then it is highly likely that their offspring will have deep and narrow chests and the resulting problems that may go with it. This is why in particular breeds we see a higher incidence in certain lines, most likely because of that line's particular chest conformation.

Age

Dogs over 7 years of age are more than twice as likely to develop gastric dilatation and volvulus as those who are 2-4 years of age.

Gender

Male dogs are twice as likely to develop gastric dilatation and volvulus as females. Neutering does not appear to have an effect on the risk of GDV.

Eating habits

Dogs fed once a day are twice as likely to develop GDV as those fed twice a day. It appears that dogs that eat rapidly or exercise soon after a meal may also be at increased risk.

Temperament

Dogs that tend to be more nervous, anxious, or fearful appear to be at an increased risk of developing GDV. Continue reading...
© 2006 Foster & Smith, Inc.
Reprinted as a courtesy and with permission from
PetEducation.com (http://www.PetEducation.com)
On-line store at http://www.DrsFosterSmith.com.
Free pet supply catalog: 1-800-323-4208